Monday, August 09, 2010

Contemplating Urban Geomorphs

Having had some success with my dungeon geomorphs (a project that will definitely continue), I am now considering branching out to other styles and genres. Specifically, I'm considering a foray into urban geomorphs (fantasy or otherwise). My question to the community is this: does anyone know of any examples of urban geomorphs? I can only think of two myself. The first would be the geomorphs from the AD&D Lankhmar: City of Adventure sourcebook. The other would be the beautiful city tiles by Tony Dowler over at Year of the Dungeon. Are there any others?

I ask because I'm trying to suss out how I want to handle the connections between tiles. I'd like to be able to feature diagonal streets in addition to vertical and horizontal ones. I'd also like to have the occasional river or canal. I have some ideas, but I want to see if other people have solved these design challenges. I'd also like to figure out a good size for the geomorphs themselves.

12 comments:

Joe said...

Dungeon magazine had an adventure that included around 8 of them on cardboard to be cut out. Maybe it was somewhere in the 20s. I' sure a web search would find it.

Cthulhu's Librarian said...

There is the Outdoor Geomorphs Set One: Walled City that TSR put out in 1977, but good luck finding a set.

You can get a small idea of the layout and connections on the tiles from the cover scans here:

http://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/miscpages/outdoor.html

Matt said...

Those are the only ones I know of - but I look forward to seeing yours.

Trey said...

No helpful suggestions to offer I'm afraid, but I'm all for it. :)

wallacejj said...

Hi All
My first post here; I hope I didn't miss any thing here, but have you checked out driv- through rpg? things like this
http://rpg.drivethrustuff.com/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=dungeon+tiles&x=6&y=9&quicksearch=1&search_filter=&filters=&search_free=&search_in_description=1&search_in_author=1&search_in_artist=1
IF that link does not work then search Dungeon Tiles....(;-Jeff

Risus Monkey said...

@Joe: Thanks for the tip. I do have old issues of Dragon, so I'll take a look tonight.

@Matt & Trey: Good to know that folks are interested. It's going to take little while to settle on a technique, but I hope to have some up soon.

@wallacejj: Thanks for the tips. The tiles available on Drive Thru are mostly dungeon stuff, though I did find a few urban tiles (there is one coming out for the new D&D 4e Essentials line). These aren't strictly geomorphs, though, and they are not well suited to randomization. But I'm going to keep looking.

Risus Monkey said...

Cthulhu's Librarian left a comment that appears to have gone missing:

"There is the Outdoor Geomorphs Set One: Walled City that TSR put out in 1977, but good luck finding a set.

You can get a small idea of the layout and connections on the tiles from the cover scans here:

http://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/miscpages/outdoor.html"

Glenn said...

I chanced across some modern-type city geomorphs recently. Well, they've suffered a bit of apocalypse but should still be worth looking at.

http://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?9957-Post-Apocalyptic-Modern-Street-Geomorphs

They're very much like the dungeon tiles by Dyson Logos and yourself.

Risus Monkey said...

@Glenn: Now THAT is what I'm talking about. Awesome and thanks for sharing!

Glenn said...

Happy to help.

Oh, and a Dungeon Magazine index tells me the geomorphs Joe mentioned up there are in issue 46. I'll have to scrounge around for one of those.

Guy Hoyle said...

Did you ever go any further with this, or find any useful modern urban geomorphs?

Tim Ballew said...

Alas, no. But now that I've found my drawing pad (lost after the move), I might give it another go. I have this idea of using Google Maps or Google Earth to capture city blocks and make them more awesome.

Speaking of which, you should see what Tony Dowler did to Seattle: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tonydowler/seattle-doomsday-map?ref=card (also http://blog.microdungeons.com/)